2016 Undergraduate Essay Prize - winners announced

Undergraduate STS Essay Prize Competition

The Undergraduate Essay Contests are designed to showcase and reward exceptional research done by undergraduate students taking Classics courses at Canadian universities. Applicants do not need to be Classics majors to submit their work. Essays written for any undergraduate course with Classical content at a Canadian university during the previous academic year are eligible. Two separate competitions are held each year. The Junior contest is for papers written by undergraduates in survey courses where no specialized knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. The Senior contest is for papers written by undergraduates in specialized upper-level courses in Classics. There are separate prizes for each of these categories:

In 2006, UCL undergraduate David Tett (UCL French) won the photography category, and Abla Kandalaft (UCL History) was shortlisted for the essay prize.

A prize will be awarded by the Society for an essay written by an undergraduate in English or in French, of between 2000 and 5000 words, on any subject within the broader scope of French studies. The award includes a cash prize of £250.

This prize is not currently running, but undergraduates can enter the Roy Porter Student Essay Prize competition.

The Undergraduate Essay Prize competition was open to all current Humanities and Social Science undergraduates, with a single prize of £150 for the winning essay. The essay had to be one which had already been submitted for a tutorial, and could be no more than 3,000 words in length.

2017 Undergraduate Essay Prize - winners announced

For the undergraduate essay prize, we request that no more than six essays per undergraduate department or programme should be submitted, each with a signed note by the Head of Department or tutor certifying the applicant’s registered status.

Undergraduate Edinburgh EAR Congress Essay Prize | …

THE GERMAN-CANADIAN STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE ESSAY PRIZE is awarded on an annual basis for the best undergraduate essay on any aspect in the field of German-Canadian Studies, including, but not limited to, anthropology, cultural studies, education, folklore, history, journalism, law, linguistics, musicology, philosophy, political science, psychology, theater and drama, theology and religious studies, and women’s studies. The essay must have been written during the preceding academic year (April-March).

This is the Undergraduate Essay Prize's introductory year, the competition being trialled in Humanities and Social Sciences. It was open to all current Humanities and Social Science undergraduates, with a single prize of £150 for the winning essay. The essay had to be one which had already been submitted for a tutorial, and could be no more than 3,000 words in length.

A student who was at the University of Exeter last year as part of the Study Abroad scheme has won the  undergraduate essay prize.

UCL undergraduate wins Erasmus essay prize


In 2006 the Society instituted three undergraduate prizes each year as part of its efforts to promote French history in universities. The prizes - one first prize of £300 and two supplementary prizes of £100 each - are awarded for the best final year undergraduate dissertation or extended research essay produced in a UK or Irish university in each academic year, concerning any aspect of French history, or any aspect of contemporary French Studies with a substantial historical dimension.

Work eligible for these prizes would normally be expected to exceed 7,000 words in length, though consideration will be given to pieces falling just short of this size. In 2006, the first year of the competition, there were 13 entries from 8 Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).

The winning dissertation is guaranteed publication on the Society's website, and might in addition be considered for publication in modified form in the Society's journal, French History (published by Oxford University Press). Those awarded one of the runner-up prizes would be considered for (though not guaranteed) publication on the website only.

Nominations for these prizes should be made ONLY by a recognised university or college of higher education, through the relevant Head of Department or Chair of Examiners covering this work. The dissertation should have been awarded first class marks. Each HEI may nominate up to three students. Students should NOT nominate themselves.

Nominations
for these prizes should be forwarded, preferably in electronic form, by Friday 28 July 2017 to Dr. Andrew W M Smith:


Undergraduate STS Essay Prize Competition. 2017 Undergraduate STS Essay Prize Competition. For the seventh year, the Program on …

The Berkeley Undergraduate Prize for Design Excellence endowment was established in the Department of Architecture at the College of Environmental Design to promote the investigation of architecture as a social art. Each year the PRIZE Committee selects a topic important to the understanding of the interaction of people and the built world that becomes the focus of the Essay Competition. This year the topic is: The Architect and the Accessible City.

R. Gapper Undergraduate Essay Prize. A prize will be awarded by the Society for an essay written by an undergraduate in English or …

The is pleased to announce the inaugural winners of its undergraduate essay prize as Stephanie Crampin for an essay entitled The contribution of Évariste Galois to the founding of group theory and Nicole Johannesen for The application of mathematical understanding in the ancient Olympic Games. Stephanie is a third year student studying mathematics and philosophy at St Hugh’s College, Oxford and Nicole a third year student studying mathematics at St Andrews University.

Competition for the first Merton College Undergraduate Essay Prize was so tight that the judges have not only named joint winners, but have chosen a runner-up as well.

Each year, the PRIZE Committee selects a topic critical to the discussion of the social art of architecture and poses a Question based on that topic. Full-time undergraduate students enrolled in any architecture degree program or majoring in architecture throughout the world (or teams of two students, one of whom may be from a collateral discipline) are invited to submit a 500-word Essay proposal responding to the Question.