A good observation essay - what is it and how to write it?

How to Write an Observation Essay - Essay Writing Ideas

To help the researcher know what to observe, DeWALT and DeWALT (2002) suggest that he/she study what is happening and why; sort out the regular from the irregular activities; look for variation to view the event in its entirety from a variety of viewpoints; look for the negative cases or exceptions; and, when behaviors exemplify the theoretical purposes for the observation, seek similar opportunities for observation and plan systematic observations of those events/behaviors. Over time, such events may change, with the season, for example, so per []

Child observation is a critical aspect in understanding child development. Involving children in activities provides a good ground for observing them. During such activities, one is able to connect with a child. Cognitive development is greatly enhanced through active involvement and participation of children in various activities. In order to keep track of children’s intellectual development, learning activities are therefore essential. This paper will be based on child observation exercise made at Kid Care Child Development Centre. The subject of the observation is A.J (4 year old African-American child).Systematic Observation of A.JA.J is a four year old African-American boy at Kid Care Child Development Centre. The child is actively involved in an art and craft activity. The boy is busy drawing various shapes including a car, a house and a tree. He does this by cutting letters from an alphabetical letter-box. A. J. then uses a sticker to mount the letters adjacent to every picture he has drawn thus giving the pictures names. For example, he has creatively written the word “Car” from the words he has cut from the letter-box and put it before the picture of a car.The child uses various materials and equipment in his activities. These include crayons of different colors, alphabetical letter-box, blade, and a pencil. A.J. is drawing his pictures on top of a flat low-sized table. From these activities, the 4-year old boy is learning the shapes of letters, sorting and classifying items into groups, shapes and colors that resemble every picture/item drawn and painted. The child is also developing self-esteem and autonomy out of his creativity demonstrated in the activities which makes the teacher to praise him.
Relating Jean Piaget’s Theory to the Child’s Behavior.

Another limitation involved in conducting observations is noted by DeWALT, DeWALT, and WAYLAND (1998). The researcher must determine to what extent he/she will participate in the lives of the participants and whether to intervene in a situation. Another potential limitation they mention is that of researcher bias. They note that, unless ethnographers use other methods than just participant observation, there is likelihood that they will fail to report the negative aspects of the cultural members. They encourage the novice researcher to practice reflexivity at the beginning of one's research to help him/her understand the biases he/she has that may interfere with correct interpretation of what is observed. Researcher bias is one of the aspects of qualitative research that has led to the view that qualitative research is subjective, rather than objective. According to RATNER (2002), some qualitative researchers believe that one cannot be both objective and subjective, while others believe that the two can coexist, that one's subjectivity can facilitate understanding the world of others. He notes that, when one reflects on one's biases, he/she can then recognize those biases that may distort understanding and replace them with those that help him/her to be more objective. In this way, he suggests, the researcher is being respectful of the participants by using a variety of methods to ensure that what he/she thinks is being said, in fact, matches the understanding of the participant. BREUER and ROTH (2003) use a variety of methods for knowledge production, including, for example, positioning or various points of view, different frames of reference, such as special or temporal relativity, perceptual schemata based on experience, and interaction with the social context—understanding that any interaction changes the observed object. Using different approaches to data collection and observation, in particular, leads to richer understanding of the social context and the participants therein. []

A REPORT OF A CHILD OBSERVATION DONE FOR AN HOUR A WEEK

As mentioned in the discussion of the limitations of observation, BERNARD suggests that gender affects one's ability to access certain information and how one views others. What is appropriate action in some cultures is dependent upon one's gender. Gender can limit what one can ask, what one can observe, and what one can report. For example, several years after completing my doctoral dissertation with Muscogee (Creek) women about their perceptions of work, I returned for additional interviews with the women to gather specific information about more intimate aspects of their lives that had been touched on briefly in our previous conversations, but which were not reported. During these interviews, they shared with me their stories about how they learned about intimacy when they were growing up. Because the conversations dealt with sexual content, which, in their culture, was referred to more delicately as intimacy, I was unable to report my findings, as, to do so, would have been inappropriate. One does not discuss such topics in mixed company, so my writing about this subject might have endangered my reputation in the community or possibly inhibited my continued relationship with community members. I was forced to choose between publishing the findings, which would have benefited my academic career, and retaining my reputation within the Creek community. I chose to maintain a relationship with the Creek people, so I did not publish any of the findings from that study. I also was told by the funding source that I should not request additional funds for research, if the results would not be publishable. []

How to Write an Observation Essay.

Other researchers have taken a different approach to explaining how to conduct observations. For example, MERRIAM (1988) developed an observation guide in which she compiled various elements to be recorded in field notes. The first of these elements includes the physical environment. This involves observing the surroundings of the setting and providing a written description of the context. Next, she describes the participants in detail. Then she records the activities and interactions that occur in the setting. She also looks at the frequency and duration of those activities/interactions and other subtle factors, such as informal, unplanned activities, symbolic meanings, nonverbal communication, physical clues, and what should happen that has not happened. In her 1998 book, MERRIAM adds such elements as observing the conversation in terms of content, who speaks to whom, who listens, silences, the researcher's own behavior and how that role affects those one is observing, and what one says or thinks. []

How to Write an Observation Essay - SolidEssay

Several researchers have noted the limitations involved with using observations as a tool for data collection. For example, DeWALT and DeWALT (2002) note that male and female researchers have access to different information, as they have access to different people, settings, and bodies of knowledge. Participant observation is conducted by a biased human who serves as the instrument for data collection; the researcher must understand how his/her gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and theoretical approach may affect observation, analysis, and interpretation. []

JOHNSON and SACKETT (1998) discuss participant observation as a source of erroneous description in behavioral research. They note that the information collected by anthropologists is not representative of the culture, as much of the data collected by these researchers is observed based on the researcher's individual interest in a setting or behavior, rather than being representative of what actually happens in a culture. For example, they report that more data has been collected about political/religious activities than about eating/sleeping activities, because the political/religious activities are more interesting to researchers than eating/sleeping activities; yet, the amount of time the cultural members spent on political/religious activities was less than 3%, while the amount of time they spent eating/sleeping was greater than 60%. Such actions skew the description of cultural activities. To alleviate this problem, they advocate the use of systematic observation procedures to incorporate rigorous techniques for sampling and recording behavior that keep researchers from neglecting certain aspects of culture. Their definition of structured observation directs who is observed, when and where they are observed, what is observed, and how the observations are recorded, providing a more quantitative observation than participant observation. []

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How to write an observation essay: samples, tips and ideas.

Observation essays are descriptive and analytical types of writing. In particular, writing observation essays, you should describe a person or a place and provide comments or analysis of what you have observed. Observation essay should be supported with examples and vivid examples. For example, tell a story from your personal life. Make sure that the example fits the theme of your observation essay! Our free blog includes many samples and examples of observation essays. One of the samples is posted below. If you need assistance with writing your observation essay, do not hesitate to request writing help at our site. Our writers are experts in writing industry and they will not decline your order despite of its complexity!