Comparing Digging and Follower by Seamus Heaney :: Papers

Saved essays Save your essays here so you can locate them quickly!Follower Seamus Heaney

Seamus Heaney is a Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was Professor of Poetry at Oxford from 1989 to 1994. In 1995 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. Heaney has lived in Dublin since 1976. Since 1981 he has spent part of each year teaching at Harvard University, where he is a Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory. Writing about Heaney in 1968, Jim Hunter, said:

“His own involvement does not exclude us: there are few private references, and the descriptive clarity of his writing makes it easy to follow...Heaney's world is a warm, even optimistic one: his tone is that of traditional sanity and humanity.”

An analysis of "Follower" by Seamus Heaney "Follower" is a poem which relates back to Seamus Heaney's past memories which he had experienced when he was at a younger age, they are memories of him and his father and their relationship. From the poem we can interpret that he was brought up on a potato farm and in many of his other poems he relates to this, this suggests that perhaps he enjoyed farming or perhaps he is expressing the family's traditions. "Follower" is a poem which strongly relates to Heaney's past life. The poem also suggests the theme of growth, at the beginning of the poem he is a young boy, who looks up to his father. However, by the end of the poem it is his father who needs help from his son.

Charles Bennett is a highly regarded, prize-winning poet whose work has been published to wide acclaim in the UK, Europe and America. He was born in the North West of England and was a mature student in the 1980s at London University and the University of Massachusetts, where he was mentored by Nobel Laureate Joseph Brodsky. Following the completion of a doctorate on the structure of meaning in Seamus Heaney’s sequences, he taught English and Drama for several years before becoming the first Director of Ledbury Poetry Festival, which he established and ran for a number of highly-successful years before stepping down to become an academic. He is currently Reader in Poetry at the University of Northampton where he leads the BA in Creative Writing. His engaging second full-length collection, How to Make a Woman Out of Water, appeared with Enitharmon in 2007. His poems have been reviewed by Frieda Hughes in The Times and have featured in over 150 poetry magazines including the Times Literary Supplement.

Follower by Seamus Heaney Essays: Over 180,000 Follower by Seamus Heaney Essays, Follower by Seamus Heaney Term Papers, Follower by …

Charles Bennett is a highly regarded, prize-winning poet whose work has been published to wide acclaim in the UK, Europe and America. He was born in the North West of England and was a mature student in the 1980s at London University and the University of Massachusetts, where he was mentored by Nobel Laureate Joseph Brodsky. Following the completion of a doctorate on the structure of meaning in Seamus Heaney’s sequences, he taught English and Drama for several years before becoming the first Director of Ledbury Poetry Festival, which he established and ran for a number of highly-successful years before stepping down to become an academic. He is currently Reader in Poetry at the University of Northampton where he leads the BA in Creative Writing. His engaging second full-length collection, How to Make a Woman Out of Water, appeared with Enitharmon in 2007. His poems have featured in over 150 poetry magazines including the Times Literary Supplement, and in 2014 he will be writer-in-residence at Wicken Fen.

Start writing remarkable essays with guidance from our expert ..

This answer is a response to an analytical question aimed at Seamus Heaney's poems 'Digging' and 'Follower'. The candidate shows a very basic response to the question, commenting on the messages of the poems well but struggling to delve much ...

Follower and Digging by Seamus Heaney - GCSE …

This answer is a response to an analytical question aimed at Seamus Heaney's poems 'Digging' and 'Follower'. The candidate shows a very basic response to the question, commenting on the messages of the poems well but struggling to delve much deeper into the the connotations of the poems. Furthermore, contextual analysis is required for all candidate hoping to score higher than a low C grade, so unfortunately that is where this essay lies. What is good here is very good, but what it lacks outweighs the pros. I would recommend learning a bit more about the poet and the reasons for him writing the poems as this shows external, independent research has been carried out and this is what they examiners love to see.

reversal. The father is described as being in the cradle of his sons arms, whereas many years ago, the son would be in the fathers arms. The son’s arms are protective of him, supporting him, as he dies. The poem ‘Follower’ by Seamus Heaney is a poem expressing the great admiration that Heaney had for his father as a child. He was brought up on a farm, and often watched his fathers skill in awe as he ploughed the fields. The poem is made up of six quatrains, and a regular rhythm is present, much like…

The poems Digging and Follower by Seamus Heaney both are powerful expressions of the poet's admiration and respect for his father

Follower and Digging by Seamus Heaney

Plutarch describes the requisites of a follower of Isis in this manner: "For as 'tis not the length of the beard, or the coarseness of the habit which makes a philosopher, so neither will those frequent shavings, or the mere wearing [of] a linen vestment constitute a votary of Isis; but he alone is a true servant or follower of this Goddess, who after he has heard, and been made acquainted in a proper manner with the history of the actions of these Gods, searches into the hidden truths which is concealed under them, and examines the whole by the dictates of reason and philosophy."


The camp itself began with a visit to Pāpākai Marae by Tongariro, where the girls heard stories from the local iwi about the mountains and the surrounding area. This was followed by a hangi at the Marae and an opportunity for the girls to demonstrate the work that they had done in small groups to illustrate important aspects of the talks that they had listened to. On Thursday morning, the Bishop was with a small group who trekked part of the Tongariro crossing. Although the weather was rough, this accompanying photo suggests that a good time was had by all! The girls (and the Bishop) learnt invaluable skills about undertaking a search and rescue exercise, from professionals in the field who had set up a real-life scenario for the girls to work through: two missing German tourists in the forest. As the girls worked to find the missing couple, the staff present were given roles to play (based on real experiences) to distract from the task at hand. Bishop HA found herself portraying the German Ambassador, and a TV reporter. Over the course of the three-hour exercise, the girls worked as a team to cover a wide search area, communicating back to base with the search management team.