New Federalist papers : essays in defense of the Constitution

New Federalist Papers: Essays in Defense of the Constitution (20th Century Fund)

Three prominent and highly visible writers confront the threats posed by current challenges to the American Constitution. In the aftermath of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, three of its most gifted participants--Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay--wrote a series of eighty-five essays, published in newspapers throughout the nation, defending the proposed new government against its opponents. Those essays, known today as the Federalist Papers, explain the philosophical basis of the Constitution and defend the idea of republican government against charges that it would lead to tyranny.

Today's political controversies call into question some of the principles that have shaped government through most of this century. New Federalist Papers, written by three constitutional experts, defends the representative democracy put in place by the framers of the Constitution. Like Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, the authors of New Federalist Papers see danger in the effort to diminish and relocate federal power. They recognize that it is the task of public discourse to bring about reasoned consideration of such issues as gun control, term limits, flag burning, the balanced budget amendment, and campaign finance reform.

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And that the said Constitution be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms; or to raise standing armies, unless necessary for the defense of the United States, or of some one or more of them; or to prevent the people from petitioning, in a peaceable and orderly manner, the federal legislature, for a redress of grievances; or to subject the people to unreasonable searches and seizures of their persons, papers or possessions.

The Federalist Papers is a compilation of essays written under the pen-name Publius by three notable men: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay. Here, they tried to present their arguments on why there was a need to ratify the Constitution in 1788. They addressed the apprehension of the people about the government that would be established by the Constitution by outlining and elaborating the processes that would uphold the people’s rights. However, many criticisms met their defense of this government including John Calhoun and Robert Dahl. These two equally distinguished men claimed that real justice cannot be achieved by heeding Publius’s advice and they each recommended a way of securing a more just society.

the Federalist Papers is a collection of newspaper essays written in defense of the Constitution.

The Federalist Papers are a collection of eighty-five articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay in favor of ratifying the United States Constitution. First appearing in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers, this collective body of work is widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time. Although the authors of The Federalist Papers foremost intended to influence the vote in favor of ratifying the Constitution, in Federalist No. 1 Hamilton explicitly set their debate in broader political terms. It has been frequently remarked, he wrote, that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.Among the many highlights of these acclaimed essays is Federalist No. 10, in which Madison discusses the means of preventing rule by majority faction and advocates for a large, commercial republic. This is generally regarded as the most important of the eighty-five essays from a philosophical perspective, and it is complemented by Federalist No. 14, in which Madison takes the measure of the United States, declares it appropriate for an extended republic, and concludes with a memorable defense of the Constitution. In Federalist No. 70, Hamilton advocates for a one-man chief executive, and in Federalist No. 78 he persuasively lays the groundwork for the doctrine of judicial review by federal courts.Though centuries old, these timeless essays remain the benchmark of American political philosophy. As eloquently stated by famed historian Richard B. Morris, The Federalist Papers serve as an ""incomparable exposition of the Constitution, a classic in political science unsurpassed in both breadth and depth by the product of any later American writer.""

new federalist papers essays in defense of the constitution

The proposed Constitution had been submitted to the states for ratification at the end of September 1787. On September 27, 1787, a writer called "Cato" (likely George Clinton) first appeared in the New York press criticising the proposition. "Brutus" (likely Robert Yates) followed on October 18, 1787. These and other articles and public letters critical of the new Constitution would eventually become known as the Anti-Federalist Papers. In response, Alexander Hamilton decided to launch an explanation and defense of the proposed Constitution to the people of the state of New York.

New Federalist Papers: Essays in Defense of the Constitution …

Three prominent and highly visible writers confront the threats posed by current challenges to the American Constitution. In the aftermath of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, three of its most gifted participants--Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay--wrote a series of eighty-five essays, published in newspapers throughout the nation, defending the proposed new government against its opponents. Those essays, known today as the Federalist Papers, explain the philosophical basis of the Constitution and defend the idea of republican government against charges that it would lead to tyranny.

Today's political controversies call into question some of the principles that have shaped government through most of this century. New Federalist Papers, written by three constitutional experts, defends the representative democracy put in place by the framers of the Constitution. Like Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, the authors of New Federalist Papers see danger in the effort to diminish and relocate federal power. They recognize that it is the task of public discourse to bring about reasoned consideration of such issues as gun control, term limits, flag burning, the balanced budget amendment, and campaign finance reform.

Three prominent and highly visible writers confront the threats posed by current challenges to the American Constitution. In the aftermath of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, three of its most gifted participants--Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay--wrote a series of eighty-five essays, published in newspapers throughout the nation, defending the proposed new government against its opponents. Those essays, known today as the Federalist Papers, explain the philosophical basis of the Constitution and defend the idea of republican government against charges that it would lead to tyranny.

Today's political controversies call into question some of the principles that have shaped government through most of this century. New Federalist Papers, written by three constitutional experts, defends the representative democracy put in place by the framers of the Constitution. Like Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, the authors of New Federalist Papers see danger in the effort to diminish and relocate federal power. They recognize that it is the task of public discourse to bring about reasoned consideration of such issues as gun control, term limits, flag burning, the balanced budget amendment, and campaign finance reform.

22/03/1999 · The New Federalist Papers: Essays in Defense of the Constitution

New Federalist Papers: Essays in Defense of the Constitution

The authors of the Federalist papers presented a masterly defense of the new system and of the major departments in the proposed central government. They also argued that the existing government under the , the country’s first constitution, was defective and that the proposed Constitution would remedy its weaknesses without endangering the liberties of the people.