Public philosophy: essays on morality in politics Michael J

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Moral and ethical decisions are not universal, they depend on many different outliers. Society, culture, media, and unpleasing circumstances can be a large determinate of ethical and moral values. The certain religion a person believes in, the culture a person is raised in and/or practices they engage in, and also the society a person lives in can drastically affect the types of ethical and moral decisions a person makes. Paul Boghossian mentions that to a lot of people, eating beef is seen as a normality, but to Hindus it is seen as immoral and unethical. Media can also influence our decision making skills; the visual effects a picture can have a person's ethical and moral values can have vast impacts on a person. For example, Susan Sontag talks about the use of pictures of diseased lungs placed on cigarette packages to make people question their decision to smoke and try to steer people away from it. She points out that, "Shock can wear off...As one can become habituated to horror in real life, one can become habituated to the horror of certain images" (Sontag 374). What was once considered immoral or unethical could be changing due to the always evolving state of our world today, outside sources such as media desensitize people and has a great impact. While society, culture, and media are impacting, expectations and pressures from peers can also greatly influence, and at times, drive our decisions. A disease or debilitating circumstances, atrocious and dreadful personal experiences, a group of overbearing and judgmental peers, and even technology, politics, and economic powers can influence our responses.

And so the extent to which the rhetoric of discrimination dictates such moral significance, it is, well, inherently discriminatory. If modern discrimination concerns revolve chiefly around impediments to the individual achieving social control over his or her own life circumstances, then subsuming the human person to an arbitrary political meaning system that no person has the right to opt out of is the epitome of discrimination. Modern discrimination claims do not so much describe social injustices as create them. Justice in the modern sense is a mere fabrication, the coercive projection of meaning and purpose upon otherwise meaningless and purposeless processes by those who have the power to do so.

People are forced to face moral challenges in making day-to-day decisions. When it comes to benefitting individual and societal good, the great question of politics is raised: what is the right thing to do? In Sophocles’ Antigone, there is a dilemma whether to abide by the laws of the gods above the laws of the state. Antigone makes a decision that not only affects her future but the future of the state under her uncle’s rule. Antigone gains a high moral sense in that she followed the laws of the gods and therefore did the morally right choice going against state laws, either case can be deemed as morally correct. In this essay it will be argued that citizens should be free to disobey state laws when conscience dictates.

Essays, Moral and Political This is an Indulgence that is given to all EssayWriters; with regard to one moral quality.

It will not be doctrinaire, nor even logical. It will abolishthe House of Lords, but quite probably will not abolish theMonarchy. It will leave anachronisms and loose ends everywhere, thejudge in his ridiculous horsehair wig and the lion and the unicornon the soldier's cap-buttons. It will not set up any explicit classdictatorship. It will group itself round the old Labour Party andits mass following will be in the trade unions, but it will drawinto it most of the middle class and many of the younger sons ofthe bourgeoisie. Most of its directing brains will come from thenew indeterminate class of skilled workers, technical experts,airmen, scientists, architects and journalists, the people who feelat home in the radio and ferro-concrete age. But it will never losetouch with the tradition of compromise and the belief in a law thatis above the State. It will shoot traitors, but it will give them asolemn trial beforehand and occasionally it will acquit them. Itwill crush any open revolt promptly and cruelly, but it willinterfere very little with the spoken and written word. Politicalparties with different names will still exist, revolutionary sectswill still be publishing their newspapers and making as littleimpression as ever. It will disestablish the Church, but will notpersecute religion. It will retain a vague reverence for theChristian moral code, and from time to time will refer to Englandas "a Christian country". The Catholic Church will war against it,but the Nonconformist sects and the bulk of the Anglican Churchwill be able to come to terms with it. It will show a power ofassimilating the past which will shock foreign observers andsometimes make them doubt whether any revolution has happened.

Public philosophy essays on morality in politics what …

A Socialist Party which genuinely wished to achieve anythingwould have started by facing several facts which to this day areconsidered unmentionable in left-wing circles. It would haverecognised that England is more united than most countries, thatthe British workers have a great deal to lose besides their chains,and that the differences in outlook and habits between class andclass are rapidly diminishing. In general, it would have recognisedthat the old-fashioned "proletarian revolution" is animpossibility. But all through the between-war years no Socialistprogramme that was both revolutionary and workable ever appeared;basically, no doubt, because no one genuinely wanted any majorchange to happen. The Labour leaders wanted to go on and on,drawing their salaries and periodically swapping jobs with theConservatives. The Communists wanted to go on and on, suffering acomfortable martyrdom, meeting with endless defeats and afterwardsputting the blame on other people. The left-wing intelligentsiawanted to go on and on, sniggering at the Blimps, sapping away atmiddle-class morale, but still keeping their favoured position ashangers-on of the dividend-drawers. Labour Party politics hadbecome a variant of Conservatism, "revolutionary" politics hadbecome a game of make-believe.

Essays on Political Morality - R

The second stanza is intended as a sort of thumb-nail sketch ofa day in the life of a 'good party man'. In the-morning a couple ofpolitical murders, a ten-minutes' interlude to stifle 'bourgeois'remorse, and then a hurried luncheon and a busy afternoon andevening chalking walls and distributing leaflets. All veryedifying. But notice the phrase 'necessary murder'. It could onlybe written by a person to whom murder is at most a WORD. PersonallyI would not speak so lightly of murder. It so happens that I haveseen the bodies of numbers of murdered men–I don't meankilled in battle, I mean murdered. Therefore I have some conceptionof what murder means–the terror, the hatred, the howlingrelatives, the post-mortems, the blood, the smells. To me, murderis something to be avoided. So it is to any ordinary person. TheHitlers and Stalins find murder necessary, but they don't advertisetheir callousness, and they don't speak of it as murder; it is'liquidation', 'elimination', or some other soothing phrase. MrAuden's brand of amoralism is only possible, if you are the kind ofperson who is always somewhere else when the trigger is pulled. Somuch of left-wing thought is a kind of playing with fire by peoplewho don't even know that fire is hot. The warmongering to which theEnglish intelligentsia gave themselves up in the period 1935-9 waslargely based on a sense of personal immunity. The attitude wasvery different in France, where the military service is hard tododge and even literary men know the weight of a pack.

1. The Role of Philosophers in the Legislative Process
2. Political Obligation
3. Rebellion
4. On Terrorism
5. Rules of War and Moral Reasoning
6. Philosophy and Practice: Some Issues about War and Peace
7. Rights, Utility, and Universalization
8. Utility and Rights
9. Arguing about Rights
10. Liberty and Equality: How Politics Masquerades as Philosophy
11. The Rights of Employees
12. What is Wrong with Slavery
13. Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity in South Africa?
14. Justice and Equality
15. Punishment and Retributive Justice
16. Contrasting Methods of Environmental Planning
17. Moral Reasoning about the Environment
References and Bibliography
Index
1. The Role of Philosophers in the Legislative Process
2. Political Obligation
3. Rebellion
4. On Terrorism
5. Rules of War and Moral Reasoning
6. Philosophy and Practice: Some Issues about War and Peace
7. Rights, Utility, and Universalization
8. Utility and Rights
9. Arguing about Rights
10. Liberty and Equality: How Politics Masquerades as Philosophy
11. The Rights of Employees
12. What is Wrong with Slavery
13. Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity in South Africa?
14. Justice and Equality
15. Punishment and Retributive Justice
16. Contrasting Methods of Environmental Planning
17. Moral Reasoning about the Environment
References and Bibliography
Index

From: Essays, Moral, Political, Essay. indd 538 9: 21 PM ESSAY II OF MORAL PREJUOICES1 T HER E is a Set of Men lately sprung up amongst us.

Morality, Law, and Politics Essay - 2104 Words | Bartleby

Ghosh ends by suggesting that politics, much like literature, has become a matter of personal moral reckoning rather than an arena of collective action. But to limit fiction and politics to individual moral adventure comes at a great cost. The climate crisis asks us to imagine other forms of human existence—a task to which fiction, Ghosh argues, is the best suited of all cultural forms. His book serves as a great writer’s summons to confront the most urgent task of our time." Average rating of this book in reviews by Amazon customers: 4.5 out of 5 stars. The web site had 20 newly created, re-written, or updated essays so far during 2017-OCT, including the above book review.