Multi-artist graffiti in , Spain

Graffiti New York. History part 1. Cyberbench. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2011.

When most people think of graffiti, they imagine "tags," or a stylized writing of a person's name. While tags are probably the most popular forms, graffiti art is much more than that. It can mean a colorful mural with a message of diversity or a black and white stencil piece protesting police brutality. In each case, graffiti art makes a statement.

Graffiti has grown to be incorporated in the growing era of technology in the form of projected images and magnetism. Yarn bombing is a form of street graffiti originating from Texas where tailors look for ways to get rid of the waste yarns through artistic expressions. Although a form of expression, street graffiti is yet to be declared as legal or vandalism.

Graffiti Graffiti As Art Or Vandalism Essay Verite' Website featuring SFSU Student Essay(s) webpage: The Art of Vandalism by Michael, San Francisco.

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From New York’s of the 1980s to the in the 2000s, the role of art in public space continues to stir controversy and debate. Under the divine tutelage of Mayor Ed Koch (such a singular historical figure that NYC lamely attempted to rebrand the great in his honor), New York spent millions trying to eradicate the menace of spraypainted tags and murals from subway cars, adding to the myriad ways that young people, mostly of color, were criminalized amid the urban crisis of deindustrialization, unemployment, and drug addiction. (See Jeff Chang’s for more on this history.) Due in part to the pioneering studies of street art by the likes of , as well as the art world’s embrace of visionary talents like and , graffiti earned mainstream cultural capital by the 1990s. More than just a defacing of public space, street art could be a lively element of the urban landscape, and walls and sidewalks could offer a new medium for artistic expression.

Free graffiti papers, essays, and research papers

To your acknowledgement that you do like some street art ,that is great. However how much graffiti would you have seen in your life if it had not been put up illicitly? Not much I am going to guess. Without the artist back in the 70s and 80s putting up their names and pieces as much as they could over and over illegally, graffiti would have never gained popularity, and probably would be a dead medium. Those who draw penises and profanity on walls and mirrors and other things are childish, street art should be what it says, art, not childish marking scribbled on a desk. There is a difference between vandalism and art, and I hope that you can understand that.

Is Graffiti Art Or Vandalism Cultural Studies Essay

The mention of the art on homes and private residence does upset me. As an artist I hold myself to a moral code, and that means not writing on private homes, cars that people use, or schools and churches. People who do this are not to be taken seriously as artist, and are looked down upon in the graffiti community.

For instance, the annual conference has brought public artworks both magisterial and modest to Atlanta’s landscape in recent years, coating building sides with paint from the of East Atlanta to the black precincts of the West End and South Atlanta. The title of this essay comes from a piece in formerly working-class Reynoldstown, where Sarah Emerson’s lavish, candy-colored mural under an overpass of the proposed Beltline was tagged (some would say defaced) by an angry artist who disagreed with the basic premise of “Living Walls.” As far as this individual was concerned, putting up Walls that Live meant that the walls were dead before–a protest against the public and private stakeholders who authorized the art as well as and the middle-class colonization of neighborhoods like Reynoldstown and nearby Cabbagetown in general. Reynoldstown lacked little in the way of old-school graffiti prior to the Living Walls project, and the traditional practice of tagging walls and painting over other people’s works in a zone of essentially illegal expression ran headlong into the concept of public art that the creator signs with her own name and the date in the corner. To some, Living Walls may seem to imply that the walls of in-town Atlanta were lifeless until a new wave of artists came along, but the landscape of Atlanta suggests otherwise. This clash is part of the public dialogue in Atlanta, and emblematic of the tectonic plates of an older, less regulated urban culture rubbing up against a newer, development-oriented discourse of capital-c Culture, Creativity, and Class. Fortunately, in ATL, these two are not always mutually exclusive, as the following photos (taken over two years) attest. (You can scroll over each image to see information about its location.)

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I am intending on exploring whether graffiti is art or vandalism

Running 150 meters long and 8 meters high, the graffiti wall in Burghausen, Germany is open to all artists who bring their own paint and creative minds. The city is located in the southeast portion of Germany, close to the Austrian border.


Photo essay by ALEXIS BEAUMONTWhen it come to graffiti, what is art for some is vandalism for others – illegal, yet also valued as "street art". The

Castleman, Craig. Getting Up. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1982.

Castllen, Rolando (Curator). Aesthetics of Graffiti April 28- July 2, 1978. San Francisco:

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1978.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J. Spraycan Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987.

Cooper, M. and Chalfant, H. Subway Art. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1984.

Dickie, G., Scalfani, R., and Roblin, R. Aesthetics: A Critical Anthology. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989.

Goldman, A. Aesthetic Value. Boulder: Westview Press, 1995.

Spitz, Ellen H. Image and Insight. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Walsh, Michael. Graffito. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1996.

Whitford, M.J. Getting Rid of Graffiti. London: E & FN Spon, 1992.





Whitford, M.J. Getting Rid of Graffiti. London: E &FN Spon, 1992, pg. 2.

Whitford, pg. 1.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J. Spraycan Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987, pg. 42.

Walsh, Michael. Graffito. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1996, pg. 12.

Whitford, pg. xii.

Walsh, pg. 11.

Castleman, Craig. Getting Up. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1982, pg.67.

Castleman, pg. 11.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J., pg. 91.

Castleman, pg. 51.

Walsh, pg. 3.

Walsh, pg. 3.

Cooper, M. and Chalfant, H. Subway Art. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1984, pg. 32.

Dickie, G., Scalfani, R., and Roblin, R. Aesthetics: A Critical Anthology. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989, pgs. 57-8.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J., pg. 10.

Goldman, A. Aesthetic Value. Boulder: Westview Press, 1995, pgs. 8-9.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J., pg. 7.

Chalfant, H. and Prigoff, J., pg. 7.

Whitford, pg. 2.

Quotes are from: Cooper, M. and Chalfant, H. Subway Art. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1984 & Walsh, Michael. Graffito. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 1996.

Art v. vandalism: the graffiti debate | Mojo

The Venice Graffiti Pit located in Venice Beach is world famous for being an open and creative space for street artists. It is not uncommon to see an artist in the middle of working on a mural her. The only downside? Artwork gets painted over by other artists in rapid succession.