T.S. Eliot,The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism
Eliot, T. S. 1921. The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism T.S. Eliot

The sacred wood; essays on poetry and criticism, By: Eliot, T

Get this from a library! The sacred wood; essays on poetry and criticism,. [T S Eliot]

Though Eliot was one of the foremost critics of the twentieth century, his critical output was most often piecemeal, usually taking the form of essays that were published in a single book such as The Sacred Wood. In this collection of essays, there are only two or perhaps three that are much read today. The remainder deals with lesser known lights of the Elizabethan and the decades following. The essays that are of interest today are the ones that are found anthologized for undergraduate and graduate students of literature. These essays include the following: "Tradition and the Individual Talent," "Hamlet and his Problems," and possibly "Rhetoric and Poetic Drama."

2015 Reprint of Original 1920 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Published in 1920, "The Sacred Wood" solidified T.S. Eliot's status as one of the preeminent critical voices of his generation. Containing the canonical "Tradition and the Individual Talent" as well as essays on Ben Johnson, Swinburne, and others, the collection shows Eliot working through a number of his most pressing critical interests: the necessary and inviolable bond between past and present literary achievement; the need for criticism that carefully attends to the integrity of a work of art, its essential relation of part to whole; and the concepts of poetic impersonality and the objective correlative.
The central essay in "The Sacred Wood" is "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Most fascinating in an initial reading of this essay is Eliot's circling, complex definition of literary tradition. It is not, he claims, a dead collection of writings by dead poets, "a lump, an indiscriminate bolus"; neither is it a body of work from which a few personal favorites can be chosen as exemplars of excellence. Instead, it is a complete order, an organic body in which each part (individual poem) relates to and derives its significance from its place in the whole (tradition).
Contents:
Introduction -- The perfect critic -- Imperfect critics: Swinburne as critic, A romantic aristocrat, The local flavour, A note on the American critic, The French intelligence -- Tradition and the individual talent -- The possibility of a poetic drama -- Euripides and Professor Murray -- "Rhetoric" and poetic drama -- Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe -- Hamlet and his problems -- Ben Jonson -- Philip Massinger -- Swinburne as poet -- Blake -- Dante.

2015 Reprint of Original 1920 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Published in 1920, "The Sacred Wood" solidified T.S. Eliot's status as one of the preeminent critical voices of his generation. Containing the canonical "Tradition and the Individual Talent" as well as essays on Ben Johnson, Swinburne, and others, the collection shows Eliot working through a number of his most pressing critical interests: the necessary and inviolable bond between past and present literary achievement; the need for criticism that carefully attends to the integrity of a work of art, its essential relation of part to whole; and the concepts of poetic impersonality and the objective correlative.
The central essay in "The Sacred Wood" is "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Most fascinating in an initial reading of this essay is Eliot's circling, complex definition of literary tradition. It is not, he claims, a dead collection of writings by dead poets, "a lump, an indiscriminate bolus"; neither is it a body of work from which a few personal favorites can be chosen as exemplars of excellence. Instead, it is a complete order, an organic body in which each part (individual poem) relates to and derives its significance from its place in the whole (tradition).
Contents:
Introduction -- The perfect critic -- Imperfect critics: Swinburne as critic, A romantic aristocrat, The local flavour, A note on the American critic, The French intelligence -- Tradition and the individual talent -- The possibility of a poetic drama -- Euripides and Professor Murray -- "Rhetoric" and poetic drama -- Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe -- Hamlet and his problems -- Ben Jonson -- Philip Massinger -- Swinburne as poet -- Blake -- Dante.

Originally published in Eliot's The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism, ..

Nonfiction T. S. Eliot The Sacred Wood: Corbis. Eliots collection of essays on poetry and criticism covers such masters of verse as Dante and Blake as well.

The sacred wood; essays on poetry and criticism, by T.S. Eliot.

The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism : T.S. Eliot : Eliot’s collection of essays on poetry and criticism covers such masters of verse as Dante and Blake. Born: Thomas Stearns Eliot 26 September 1888 St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. Died: 4 January 1965 (aged 76) Kensington, London, England: Occupation: Poet, dramatist.

The Sacred Wood Collection of Eliot’s essays on poetry and criticism

2015 Reprint of Original 1920 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Published in 1920, "The Sacred Wood" solidified T.S. Eliot's status as one of the preeminent critical voices of his generation. Containing the canonical "Tradition and the Individual Talent" as well as essays on Ben Johnson, Swinburne, and others, the collection shows Eliot working through a number of his most pressing critical interests: the necessary and inviolable bond between past and present literary achievement; the need for criticism that carefully attends to the integrity of a work of art, its essential relation of part to whole; and the concepts of poetic impersonality and the objective correlative.
The central essay in "The Sacred Wood" is "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Most fascinating in an initial reading of this essay is Eliot's circling, complex definition of literary tradition. It is not, he claims, a dead collection of writings by dead poets, "a lump, an indiscriminate bolus"; neither is it a body of work from which a few personal favorites can be chosen as exemplars of excellence. Instead, it is a complete order, an organic body in which each part (individual poem) relates to and derives its significance from its place in the whole (tradition).
Contents:
Introduction -- The perfect critic -- Imperfect critics: Swinburne as critic, A romantic aristocrat, The local flavour, A note on the American critic, The French intelligence -- Tradition and the individual talent -- The possibility of a poetic drama -- Euripides and Professor Murray -- "Rhetoric" and poetic drama -- Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe -- Hamlet and his problems -- Ben Jonson -- Philip Massinger -- Swinburne as poet -- Blake -- Dante.

2015 Reprint of Original 1920 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Published in 1920, "The Sacred Wood" solidified T.S. Eliot's status as one of the preeminent critical voices of his generation. Containing the canonical "Tradition and the Individual Talent" as well as essays on Ben Johnson, Swinburne, and others, the collection shows Eliot working through a number of his most pressing critical interests: the necessary and inviolable bond between past and present literary achievement; the need for criticism that carefully attends to the integrity of a work of art, its essential relation of part to whole; and the concepts of poetic impersonality and the objective correlative.
The central essay in "The Sacred Wood" is "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Most fascinating in an initial reading of this essay is Eliot's circling, complex definition of literary tradition. It is not, he claims, a dead collection of writings by dead poets, "a lump, an indiscriminate bolus"; neither is it a body of work from which a few personal favorites can be chosen as exemplars of excellence. Instead, it is a complete order, an organic body in which each part (individual poem) relates to and derives its significance from its place in the whole (tradition).
Contents:
Introduction -- The perfect critic -- Imperfect critics: Swinburne as critic, A romantic aristocrat, The local flavour, A note on the American critic, The French intelligence -- Tradition and the individual talent -- The possibility of a poetic drama -- Euripides and Professor Murray -- "Rhetoric" and poetic drama -- Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe -- Hamlet and his problems -- Ben Jonson -- Philip Massinger -- Swinburne as poet -- Blake -- Dante.

Ts Eliot Essays ts1 The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism By T.S

"The Hollow Men" (1925) is a poem by T

2015 Reprint of Original 1920 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Published in 1920, "The Sacred Wood" solidified T.S. Eliot's status as one of the preeminent critical voices of his generation. Containing the canonical "Tradition and the Individual Talent" as well as essays on Ben Johnson, Swinburne, and others, the collection shows Eliot working through a number of his most pressing critical interests: the necessary and inviolable bond between past and present literary achievement; the need for criticism that carefully attends to the integrity of a work of art, its essential relation of part to whole; and the concepts of poetic impersonality and the objective correlative.
The central essay in "The Sacred Wood" is "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Most fascinating in an initial reading of this essay is Eliot's circling, complex definition of literary tradition. It is not, he claims, a dead collection of writings by dead poets, "a lump, an indiscriminate bolus"; neither is it a body of work from which a few personal favorites can be chosen as exemplars of excellence. Instead, it is a complete order, an organic body in which each part (individual poem) relates to and derives its significance from its place in the whole (tradition).
Contents:
Introduction -- The perfect critic -- Imperfect critics: Swinburne as critic, A romantic aristocrat, The local flavour, A note on the American critic, The French intelligence -- Tradition and the individual talent -- The possibility of a poetic drama -- Euripides and Professor Murray -- "Rhetoric" and poetic drama -- Notes on the blank verse of Christopher Marlowe -- Hamlet and his problems -- Ben Jonson -- Philip Massinger -- Swinburne as poet -- Blake -- Dante.